Little Browns but Big Color

I Love this time of the Year! Winter in the Rockies is a very interesting time and the best part is, every winter is different. This year has been quite dramatic compared to last years massive snow dump. Currently we don’t have the same snow levels but we have some cold temps. Everything is being affected by this. The fishing is still pretty good though.

Personally this is my favorite time for working with freshwater trout species because the Rainbows are in spawning color and the Browns are coming out of the Fall spawn so they are turning a really dark brown. How do you bring out these colors? A little pop of flash and some under exposure. Keep in mind that the subject doesn’t have to be a huge specimen. The little guys can have great color to. The trick is really watching the highlights and light spillage because those white spots from the flash are eye sores.

Captured with Nikon D5, 24-70 AF-S, SB-5000 on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

A Week of Remembrance

This has been a week of remembrance indeed. Firstly, former President George H. W. Bush was laid to rest after his passing last Friday. Then, today, we mark the seventieth seventh anniversary of Pearl Harbor. The events that took place day changed everything for this country, for the world and for the former President who eventually flew TBM Avengers in the Pacific. It is important that we remember and honor these people and days as we continue forward in life.

Natural Spotlight

Nature does some pretty amazing things when we just stop and look to see whats going on. I always bring my camera with me when I go out fishing because I never know what will pop up. This particular evening nature brought out one of the best things for landscape photography, a spotlight. Spotlights and vignettes are great resources for landscapes because they focus the viewers eyes on what you want them to see and they ignore the rest. While often I use ACR to enhance such light, sometimes in nature it’s just there and you don’t have to do anything more then just point and click.

Images Captured with Nikon D5, 24-70 AF-S, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

Having Fun in the Crazies

There is always something amazing about skies that are so powerful that they make the earth seem small. The Crazy Mountains are not as famous as the Bridgers or Gallatin Mountains but are still plenty impressive. I always loved days like this where you can capture the mountains that are so far away but still seem so clear. This was taken with the D5 and 24-70 AF-S and then finished in Adobe Camera Raw. What really makes the drama pop in something like this is focusing on the mountains and with a more shallow depth of field making everything feel smaller and further away. Then with the help of Dehaze the contrast just pops out.

Fall Fishing Fun

Fall color is great but finding those days where the color pops without a grey sky sure are hard to find here in the Rockies. So what do you do? I struggle with this question a lot of times because the color of the trees is always so seductive but I know that having any sky will just suck. Even so I have to try and get something out of it. When I came upon this scene I actually wanted to pass it over but Alex stepped in and made it a little more interesting. The big thing that I found really helps in these scenarios is your exposure compensation. It was a dark day so pumping up the exposure comp made a huge difference. Beyond that trying to minimize the amount of sky in the composition also helps.

Image Captured with Nikon D5, 24-70 AF-S, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

Glorious Steam and the Challenges it Produces

Fall is one of my favorite times of the year for many reasons. The fishing is great, the days are colder, I’m still a ski bum at heart and of course the landscape is beautiful. Everyday it’s just a little bit different with more snow and a little more frost. With the colder temps at night, the heat of the day as the sun comes up and the free flowing water not freezing, one great element that is created is the steam coming off of the water. I’ve spent many Falls and Winters chasing those great steam images and each year I think I’ve found the best one until the next year rolls around. As for photographing steam, a lot depends on the volume that is being produced. When there is a smaller amount it’s harder to go wide so a longer lens would work better. If there’s dramatic lighting or a dark background behind the steam then those elements are definitely worth incorporating into your composition. It’s kinda hard to make a bad steam image but it’s easy to make one that is boring. You just have to play around with the amount of steam there is available.

Image Captured with Nikon D5, 24-70 AF-S, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

A Year Later

Photography is all about capturing those moments in time so we can go back and look at them. That’s why it’s important to take as many photos as possible so you can see the changes that are happening around you. From an environmental standpoint, every year you photograph landscapes or wildlife and then you go back and see those same areas or critters, you can see the changes that have occurred. Last year one important lesson I learned with the crazy weather system we had, was to go out more on the days that had terrible grey skies. I thought nothing would come from them but I learned that often times they would yield just a sliver of light and that sliver would be enough for a single image. Now I still go out to these same spots and still see the changes but every time I try to learn and improve on them.

Images Captured with Nikon D5, 24-70 AF-S, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

How to Work with a Net

This is one obstacle that I’ve had mixed feelings over for some time when it comes to fishing photography. What do you do with the dang net? For the longest time I hated having a net in my photos. I always felt it was a prison for the subject. A way to take the focus off of a wild species and make it more human impacted. Over time I’ve slowly begun to find ways to incorporate it that look okay to me. The two big pluses for leaving it in the image are one it gives you more time to work with the subject, especially in case you drop the fish and two it’s safer for the subject. Working with aquatic species can be tough because you have to be careful of how long you keep them out of the water. The one little trick I have found in post production when it comes to net usage is really darken the edges so it’s not to distracting.

Image Captured with Nikon D5, 24-70 AF-S, SB-5000 Flash, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

A Splash of Color Goes a Long Way

When it comes to a photograph we tend to put a lot of emphasis on the size of subjects and the amount of negative space around that subject. It’s really important to remember that subjects don’t always have to be big. They can take up a very small amount of space in the overall composition if all the elements around it support it. This P-51 Mustang is a great example as it’s belly is painted a bright orange and with a dark background it pops even if it’s small.

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