Oshkosh Has Started!

There is no event on the planet that is quite like EAA Airventure in Oshkosh, WI. Hosted every year by EAA at Wittman Regional Airport, Airventure is the world’s largest Fly-in with over 10,000 aircraft usually in participation throughout the week. Hundreds of thousands of people attend every year and for the true aviation enthusiast there is nothing better. For a photographer, it’s paradise because there is more photograph then you have time for. With so much available how do you not get overloaded?

Unfortunately this year I will not be able to attend Osh, but having gone multiple times over the years I have plenty to talk about and advice to give. The big thing to start with is to not get overwhelmed. There is a lot to see at Oshkosh and it’s really easy to feel like you have to see and photograph everything. The simple truth is you can’t. There is just too much. Your best bet is to research the different areas and setup a basic schedule for where you want to be and when. For instance, down at warbird alley, getting there early in the morning is a great way to get static shots of just the planes and not the crowds. Or like the image above, staying late to avoid people in your photos. Remember to go tight and to go wide. Something like the Nikon D5 with the 18-35 f/3.5-4.5 or 70-200VRII to give multiple options with the static planes. Oshkosh is great because you can get close and get those detail shots so take advantage of that.

It’s Friday, Time to Be Outside

Since it’s not always possible to have the camera in hand all the time, today’s the day to start planning this weekends shooting fun. Two days are never enough but at least it’s time behind the lens. Now whatever your field maybe, be sure to spend some time and do your homework today so that you’re prepared for the next day. Before I head out I always look into the area, the weather and what’s happening so that I stack the deck the best I can to get the best photos possible. Does this always pan out? No. But it doesn’t hurt either.

Images Captured with Nikon D750, 24-70 AF-S, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

Summer Skies and Puffy Clouds

Since the cool temps of this past spring have finally ended, the heat of summer has brought many great days of cloud filled skies. As I have talked many times before about and will continue to talk about, puffy clouds are always a great element in landscape photography. You really just can’t go wrong with them no matter which way you compose. Minimal landmass and lots of sky is one way I learned a long time ago that works great with landscapes and puffy clouds.

Image captured with Nikon D5, 24-70 AF-S, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

Love Those Old Buildings

Old buildings are certainly common here in Montana but every time I find one I start getting excited. They just make great photo subjects. Each one has its own character and usually has some nice space around it. Add in a little bit of interesting light and boom, there’s a photo. I took this with the D5 and 70-200VRII, didn’t need much in ACR, just brought out what was already there. The one big thing about old buildings is be sure to remove, whether during composing or in post, anything modern looking. It kind of takes the viewer away from the scene having modern stuff in the frame.

Chasing Those Storms

The thrill of the chase, the camera in the lap and the light on the horizon. Sometimes it can be really rewarding being a photographer. While I have never considered myself a landscape photographer, just a photographer, I do enjoy getting those images that show off the world around me. How do I go about doing that?

Really simple. I sit inside and watch the weather until I figure out what it’s going to do. A storm went through the other night and after spending quite a bit of time watching, I could see that there was an opening out to the west and clouds to the east so the sky was going to pop. After that it was just finding a good spot. I went out with the D5 and 70-200 VRII getting some close ups of the light hitting the beautiful Montana landscape. Pretty simple click with a little bit of finishing in ACR.

Big Bugs, Big Fish

Once a year the Salmon Flies reproduce along the rivers in the west. Every year the avid fly fishermen goes out day after day to hit the hatch at just the right time to watch the feeding and participate in the fun. The fish go crazy and pig out. Even the little guys become little chubbies as the giant bugs hit the water. The Brown Trout especially enjoy this time of the year. For a photographer it’s a lot of fun with a couple of buddies hitting the water and taking some snaps.

Images taken with Nikon D5, 70-200VRII, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

Depth of Field and Scale

Scale in a photograph can be measured in multiple forms. It can add drama and sense of placement for everything in the photograph. It can also make it confusing as to whats what. In a world where everything man makes becomes bigger and bigger, it’s easy to loose sight of the fact that the world is still bigger. Using the D5 and 70-200 VRII, the landscape and houses along the Madison River compress into one view but the scale is still there.

Spring Puffies

This is a lesson I learned a long time ago from my Dad and it has to do a lot with the rule of thirds. Is it always necessary when you’re composing? Spring puffies are a great example in my mind because they fill the sky and add so much character that they could practically fill the frame by themselves. In that instance do you even need the land? Two thirds of this photo are filled with clouds which breaks the rule but it is also makes it more compelling then the alternative. Rules are important as a basic guideline when you start. Some are carved in stone due to the physics of light that they encompass. Others can be bent. It’s our job to figure out which are which.

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