Angle Says a Lot

There are many tricks in photography to force the viewers eyes to believe what we want them to believe. It takes time, experience and knowledge to know when and how to use these tricks. In this case, I was having a discussion about how to get a photograph right at water level without getting wet. It’s a popular image at the moment. In this instance getting super low by laying on a rock and then shooting downstream so the subject, Dan, was lower then I was, it became rather simple to create the look of being in the water. Now I was also using the D750 and 70-200 VRII, one for a longer focal range and then two because I was able to control more of my background and thus blur out more details.

Seeing Things in a New Light

I love and hate how photography changes. It is constantly evolving and sometimes that can be super fun because you get to learn new things and try out new things which can lead to some really awesome images. On the flip side it can be really frustrating especially when you get behind the curve and then you feel this tremendous pressure to catch up. But that’s how the business goes and there’s no way around it.

Well one way in which photography is always changing is our own eyes. We grow as photographers by incorporating our life experiences into our photography and sometimes that means going back to somewhere you’ve been countless times and just seeing the world around you a little differently. I’ve gone to this place many times to fish, I’ve photographed it several times but I never saw this. I always thought this dam was ugly but not this time. The way the light moved through the canyon and lit up the water was something I had never paid attention to before and it just goes to show how little it takes to come up with something new.

Images Captured with Nikon D750, 24-70 AF-S, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

It’s Friday, Time to Be Outside

Since it’s not always possible to have the camera in hand all the time, today’s the day to start planning this weekends shooting fun. Two days are never enough but at least it’s time behind the lens. Now whatever your field maybe, be sure to spend some time and do your homework today so that you’re prepared for the next day. Before I head out I always look into the area, the weather and what’s happening so that I stack the deck the best I can to get the best photos possible. Does this always pan out? No. But it doesn’t hurt either.

Images Captured with Nikon D750, 24-70 AF-S, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

Summer Skies and Puffy Clouds

Since the cool temps of this past spring have finally ended, the heat of summer has brought many great days of cloud filled skies. As I have talked many times before about and will continue to talk about, puffy clouds are always a great element in landscape photography. You really just can’t go wrong with them no matter which way you compose. Minimal landmass and lots of sky is one way I learned a long time ago that works great with landscapes and puffy clouds.

Image captured with Nikon D5, 24-70 AF-S, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

Big Bugs, Big Fish

Once a year the Salmon Flies reproduce along the rivers in the west. Every year the avid fly fishermen goes out day after day to hit the hatch at just the right time to watch the feeding and participate in the fun. The fish go crazy and pig out. Even the little guys become little chubbies as the giant bugs hit the water. The Brown Trout especially enjoy this time of the year. For a photographer it’s a lot of fun with a couple of buddies hitting the water and taking some snaps.

Images taken with Nikon D5, 70-200VRII, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

Depth of Field and Scale

Scale in a photograph can be measured in multiple forms. It can add drama and sense of placement for everything in the photograph. It can also make it confusing as to whats what. In a world where everything man makes becomes bigger and bigger, it’s easy to loose sight of the fact that the world is still bigger. Using the D5 and 70-200 VRII, the landscape and houses along the Madison River compress into one view but the scale is still there.

Photography Friends

 

Photography has a lot of different meanings that come with the camera. It’s never just as simple as taking a pretty picture. There are times when that might be the result but that probably wasn’t where that photo started nor where you wanted it to end. For me it started with wanting to explore Montana and over the course of a decade it has expanded. The one thing I wasn’t expecting was the friends that I would make along the journey.

That’s the part of photography that most don’t tell you about. It’s not just about getting clients and getting the job done. Because of the advancements in technology today, it’s easy to keep all those photos that we take and we share with us at all times. So those clients that you work with can look at your photos as often as you do and that’s how they remember you. Then over time they become friends. Photography is like no other business in this regard. The ability to look at those photographs everyday and be reminded of all those good times.

A Couple Tips to Working in Steam

Steam is one of the best parts of winter landscape photography. It adds so much drama and character to the images that the landscapes can take on a whole different life form. If you don’t believe me then find a good spot in winter, take a picture and then go back in the summer and you will see the awesome difference. But how do you protect your camera gear while working in that steam?

First off this is for those that are standing in steam while also photographing it. If you’re a good distance away then your gear really isn’t in any danger. With that when you are standing next to a steam pocket remember that the external surfaces of the cameras are quite resilient. It is the internal electronics that aren’t, so don’t change lenses, or cards or batteries while standing in steam. Next carry a towel with you to gently dab off any moisture that gets on the surfaces, especially by the buttons. Lastly be careful with the front element and what I mean is that steam is hot but the air around the steam is not so if you stick that lens into the steam and it gets hot and then you quickly move somewhere else where it is cool then that difference in temperature can cause damage. Instead try covering the front element afterward and then move. Let it be a little more gradual temperature change. I highly recommend NC Filters for these kind of shoots because if you damage a filter it’s no big deal where as a front element is. Don’t be afraid of nature just be aware of what can happen and be prepared.

Personal Projects are Important!

Photography is filled with ups and downs as we are forced to create more content. It never gets easier but every now and then it can be rewarding. No matter what field you work in there is going to be those lows and highs. The question becomes how do you get past those lows when they come?

There are a number of different ways that you can get over those lows but one way that works well is to find a personal project and truly invest yourself in it. Personal projects come in all shapes and sizes and for the most part they make more sense to you then they ever will to anyone else. I spent the last 7 months working on a personal project and having just completed it I can honestly say that the personal projects really do make a difference. It sucks feeling the constant need to commit time in order to complete the project but in the end it’s all worth it. I’ll go into more detail as to what the project was at a later date but it does feel good to get it done.

Spot Lighting Works on Rapids

It’s great when everything comes together and you get that perfect amount of light coming through the clouds right on the spot you want it to. It never seems to happen when you want it to but every now and then the heavens smile on us. Well this was one of those moments where everything just kinda clicked, maybe it was just right place at the right time or maybe it was a reward for climbing up a cliff face. Who knows.

Rapids are a lot of fun to work with because you photograph them many different ways. You can use a fast shutter or a slow shutter, you can go tight and show just the water or really wide and show everything. You can go high and look down or get low and level with the river. Each way show another perspective which makes it fun. The two big things I look for is good light and a good anchor point. Now I don’t like using the word anchor because it gets used way to much with landscapes and often times those anchors suck but with fast moving water you need some sort of spot for the viewers eye to relax against because all that movement in the water makes it hard to look at the image for too long. Light is the obvious one since every good image needs good light but it’s always good to remember that element. Keep in mind also that everyone does long exposure moving water shots so try and be creative with yours.

Images Captured with Nikon D750, 24-70 AF-S, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

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