Aerial Landscape Lesson

I actually have more of a question then a lesson here. If you get the chance to go up flying is it worthwhile to photograph the earth below you or not? Since I have never considered myself an aerial landscape photographer I can’t say that I really got into this sort of thing. But it comes down one of the basis of photography and that is every opportunity is a chance for another photograph. Since you never know when or where you might need a certain photograph, often times it’s best to just keep shooting so that you have plenty of options, right? Well that’s my thinking at least.

But to add another layer of thinking to this. When you’re flying and you have the chance for an aerial landscape shot, do you leave the strut of the plane in or take it out? The same could be said with a commercial plane if you have a seat over the wing. Do you even have to choose or can you just take both images? If both options are presented and you can do both I tend to lean towards that. Again it comes down to taking advantage of every opportunity that comes your way. In a travel piece having that strut in the photo could add a little more backstory. For an environmental or commercial purpose maybe having a clean look is better.  These are things to think about when you’re out shooting because you just never know.

Images Captured with Nikon D5, 24-70 AF-S, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

Depth of Field and Scale

Scale in a photograph can be measured in multiple forms. It can add drama and sense of placement for everything in the photograph. It can also make it confusing as to whats what. In a world where everything man makes becomes bigger and bigger, it’s easy to loose sight of the fact that the world is still bigger. Using the D5 and 70-200 VRII, the landscape and houses along the Madison River compress into one view but the scale is still there.

Spring Puffies

This is a lesson I learned a long time ago from my Dad and it has to do a lot with the rule of thirds. Is it always necessary when you’re composing? Spring puffies are a great example in my mind because they fill the sky and add so much character that they could practically fill the frame by themselves. In that instance do you even need the land? Two thirds of this photo are filled with clouds which breaks the rule but it is also makes it more compelling then the alternative. Rules are important as a basic guideline when you start. Some are carved in stone due to the physics of light that they encompass. Others can be bent. It’s our job to figure out which are which.

Time in the Field

Time in the field is a necessity in order to get better with your camera. The more you spend the better you will get. That is the nature of being human and the truth with all things you can get better at. However, does every photo shoot you go on need to take a lot of time? Is simply going out for say an hour, enough to make you better or just keep your skills on par with where they have always been?

I think about this often in Spring because we get great thunderstorms in the afternoons and it’s often fun to go out just for sunset to capture their beauty. Not long in the field but still time. While that simple afternoon shot often provides enough for a blog post it doesn’t do much else besides that. It is something but it doesn’t seem like much. So that’s the dilemma. How much time in the field is enough even when you come back with a result?

April Showers Bring May Flowers

Not in Montana! This old adage is a favorite among farmers and ranchers but it certainly doesn’t seem to apply this year. With storm after storm bring record levels of water content into the mountains it’s hard to say when the snow will give way, when the temps will rise and when those posies will blossom.

These two images were taken in June a while back because like this year, those years the bloom didn’t happen until June. Now I have never been a huge macro flower person but I love landscapes that are filled with color from those flowers. Something as simple as a field of Mustard Grass can be rather amazing. Like with all my landscapes I look for clean backgrounds and clean lines. Notice there are no trails of people having walked through the flowers. Also blue sky days are great, blue sky days with puffy clouds are even better. Don’t go just for the sake of going, be picky, and find the good days. I bring this up now because with all photo subjects you need to prep ahead of time.

Longer Lenses For Landscapes

I really like using longer lenses even mid range lenses when it comes to landscapes. I often find that there are avenues in landscape photography that make for a stronger composition then if you were to use a wider lens and capture more info. A big part of landscape photography is finding those areas where the light is making a statement about the land. Too much negative or positive space can lead to a boring image. Kinda like here, having a wider lens really wouldn’t add anymore to the story.

Winter landscapes and black and white photography really remind me of poetry. I don’t know why but that’s just where my mind goes. When the afternoon goes from gorgeous god beams to so flat a grey that you could use it as a color checker it makes one wonder what kind of poem is being written. Low clouds, steam from the rivers and folks burning ground clutter can make for some interesting backgrounds. Combined with Cottonwoods and snow the valley can become rather surreal, much like a poem.

Images Captured with Nikon D5, 70-200 VRII, on Lexar UDMA Digital Film

A Break From the Storm

Well it’s starting to feel like winter already which is kind of amazing considering how short fall was. With this last big storm that swept across Montana, a blanket of snow was dropped and it was a pretty good size blanket. We got a good foot here in the valley which is actually typical for November as we always seem to get at least one big storm before Thanksgiving.

When big storms come through I watch the weather carefully never knowing when the whole will come in the clouds letting in just enough light to really make that fresh powder shine. Sunday we had a few hours before the next storm cell would bring in more snow I went out looking at all that great powder. Sadly I returned with nothing. That’s how it goes sometimes. You get all ready to find that image only to return empty handed. Then looking out the window in a brief moment there was the image. This is why it’s important to have a camera on your desk for you never know when it’s going to be needed. This was a simple click with the D5 and 70-200 VRII out my window towards the neighbors horse ranch. A little bit of finishing in ACR and there ya go.

A New Ranch To Explore

One of the reasons I became a photographer was because I enjoyed exploring. One of the great things about Montana is that there is a whole lot of area to explore. One of those areas I got to explore recently was a private ranch outside of Columbus and not only was it a huge ranch it still had that old timey western feel, like at any point some outlaw was about to ride up on his horse.

One thing that can make a difference in your photography is to challenge yourself by only using one lens. While I was out at this ranch I did a lot of hiking. I decided to make life simple and carry only one lens, one body. The light was somewhat diffused but nothing worthwhile by going wide, so I went with the D5, 70-200 VRII and a TC-17E II in my pocket. I was looking for those pockets of light where the most drama could be found.

Obviously, I found an old building. It’s really not that hard to do in Montana, there are a lot of old structures still standing. Each one has its own characteristics which make it unique. This particular one was kinda sinking in on one side and slanted over on the other side. So when it comes to these structures showing these details are important.

As you can see even with just one lens, with a little time you can go from that wide shot, to the detail shot and capture the whole story. My favorite part is all the nails going in at an angle.

Weekend Plans?

If there is one thing that determines where I go out shooting more then the light it’s the weather. Weather means clouds or no clouds, high wind or no wind, hard light or diffused light. All of these elements change where the best shooting locations will be for landscape and will change the behavior of the critters in the nearby areas. No matter what the case is, gotta get the camera out.

After a week of rain and snow this weekend is the first to have sunshine in it. Which means that critters will be active. Not sure what the plan is yet but I know it will involve a camera.

Winter Weather

Despite the fact that it is spring right now, we are getting snow. While this is great for water content, we need as much as we can get, for photography it’s a little boring. Grey skies never make for really interesting subject matter but the key thing to remember is that they don’t always last. If you’re patient, between snow showers comes small openings that let in light and drama in the clouds. That’s when it’s best to be ready to shoot.

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